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Entertainment
Historic Unedited Photos They Don't Want You To See
Publication: Historical Archives.
Posted by
760a631d0dea2ae92cb6e9f7b157b927
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Timothy McVeigh

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Summary:
168 people died and more than 680 more were injured when a truck bomb was detonated in Oklahoma City in 1995. Timothy McVeigh and two other men were found guilty, but only McVeigh was sentenced to death.
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Timothy McVeigh


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Before the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001 changed the course of world history as we know it, there had been a recent terrorist attack in the United States that ranked as the most shocking and deadly in the country’s history. It was carried out by a U.S. citizen, as well, which came as a surprise to many. Of course, we’re referring to the Oklahoma City bombing at the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building that occurred on April 19, 1995. People were pointing fingers in seemingly every direction trying to figure out the culprit of the attack.

Those talks lasted for less than two hours as it was found that Timothy McVeigh was responsible for the bombing that claimed the lives of nearly 170 people with nearly 700 injured as a result. For his terroristic crimes, McVeigh was sentenced to death at a federal prison in Indiana. Nearly 20 years later, McVeigh is still one of the most talked about terrorists of all-time, even if the 9/11 attacks that happened exactly three months after his death took away much of the talk about his life initially.

McVeight might have laid out his attack on the midwest, but had been from New York where he was born on April 23, 1968 and was raised in the state. According to McVeigh himself, he didn’t have an easy upbringing as he was a bit of a loner and was bullied as a youngster. However, McVeigh did excel in working with computers, but had also developed an interest in guns. This led McVeigh into wanting to join the military, enlisting with the United States Army.

His time in the service was problematic to say the least as McVeigh had often been seen as a white supremacist that often went into racial tirades against some of this fellow soldiers. Still, McVeigh was used by the Army to head overseas when the United States engaged in the Gulf War. Despite his problems, McVeigh was given an honorable discharge in the early 1990s and spent much of his time afterward developing a hatred for the government and wanted less regulation on gun control within the country.

McVeigh’s disassociation with the government only grew stronger in the few years that followed, and he felt that he had to send a message in the most extremist way imaginable. Many within the government had been alerted to McVeigh’s behavior as being suspicious, but with no crimes committed, taking action wouldn’t be easy.

Along the way, McVeigh found an accomplice in the form of Terry Nichols, a man from Michigan that had also served in the Army that developed anti-government views. Working together, they decided that attacking a federal building would get their point across the most, and set their plan into action. McVeigh and Nichols rented a truck that they armed with several tons of explosives that would be certain to do a lot of damage.

On the morning of April 19, 1995, it would be McVeigh that drove the truck in front of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building at 9:00 a.m. when the campus opened. McVeigh then lit multiple fuses that start the process of the vehicle’s explosion with McVeigh getting away from the explosion area. Just a couple of minutes after his arrival, the truck had exploded, causing instant damage to the building, as well as several others in the surrounding area with an estimate of more than $650 million in damage.

A total of 168 people had lost their lives as a result of the massive explosion, injuring hundreds more. What made it even worse is that the truck was parked directly under the daycare center of the Murrah Federal Building. The instant reaction from people both within and outside of the government thought it was likely an attack from terrorists from a different country. However, investigators were quick onto the scene and found the truck that housed the explosives.

These investigators were able to find the vehicle identification number on a piece of the car, tracing it back to McVeigh since he had signed off on the rental. Within two hours, McVeigh was arrested while driving a getaway car, having no license plate and a loaded weapon on his person. McVeigh was taken into custody and was questioned on the bombing, though he maintained his innocence at first.

Here, you see McVeigh being led out of the courthouse in Perry, Oklahoma en route to a helicopter that would take him to Oklahoma City on April 21. That same day, Nichols turned himself in to authorities as a full investigation was underway. Within two months, McVeigh had been indicted on nearly a dozen charges, with his trial being set in Denver. It wasn’t the longest trial, as McVeigh was found guilty less than two years after his indictment and the movement of the trial hundreds of miles away.

Because of an act that had passed during the trial, McVeigh was eligible for the death penalty due to his terroristic act. With that, McVeigh was found guilty for all of his charges and sent to a federal prison, getting transferred to the facility in Terre Haute, Indiana in 1999 and was set for death row. All of McVeigh’s appeals were denied by the court, and in 2001 he decided to give up the fight and was given the date for execution.

On June 11, 2001 in the prison, McVeigh was executed in a non-public setting, accessible via only closed circuit television. It was a lethal injection that ended the 33 year old’s life and the story of America’s deadliest domestic terrorist. As for his co-conspirator Nichols, he’s still alive and is at the federal prison in Florence, Colorado where he was found guilty of 161 counts of murder, sending him to imprisonment for life without any possibility of parole.