Entertainment
Historic Unedited Photos They Don't Want You To See
Publication: Historical Archives. Posted by
760a631d0dea2ae92cb6e9f7b157b927
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Entertainment
Historic Unedited Photos They Don't Want You To See
Publication: Historical Archives.
Posted by
760a631d0dea2ae92cb6e9f7b157b927
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Parisian Model

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Where:
Paris, France
When:
1920s
Summary:
Dressed in the elegant style of the time, a young woman poses with a newspaper in hand on the streets of the City of Lights.
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Parisian Model


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  Where:
Paris, France

  When:
1920s

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The 1920s, often known as the “Roaring 20s” were certainly an interesting time not only in America but around the world. The fashion was much different than it is today, but has always been appreciated over the years with many people enjoying vintage photos of the times. Here we see one that many would enjoy as a woman in France is reading a newspaper, showing off the fashion styles of the time and giving a glimpse to what Paris was like during the decade. It also gives you a glimpse as to what was happening in the news for Parisians.

The decade marked a new time in Paris with this being a shot from the beginning of the decade. France had just been engaged in World War I throughout the 1910s, leaving a lot of damage to the city. Rations were running quite low and people weren’t getting all of the utilities and food that they needed as France needed to concentrate those resources for combay. Everyone on the homefront was doing their part for Paris, with many having served in World War I.

Following the war, things didn’t rebound immediately for Paris. Food was still being rationed as people were struggling to find work and the look of the city had changed dramatically. For many, it was at least a solace to see that World War I had ended and that most of the dangers were gone. Of course, Paris would see more damage as a result of World War II a couple of decades later, but the 1920s at least offered a time of peace for the city.

This decade, like how it’s referred to as the Roaring 20s for many in the west, also had a name in France. The term was Annees folles, which translates into English as Crazy Years. This was a time of artistic advancement within Paris and the rest of the country, with morale improving on a yearly basis. Paris started changing into something that we see today with cafes popping up left and right, which Paris has become well known for.

Entertainment also changed dramatically in the 1920s as the influence from the United States in the industry had changed the way that Parisians were watching and listening. Music started to embrace the jazz music that had become popular in the United States, as well as launching the careers of many famous dancers. There were also more operas established throughout Paris, becoming one of the more popular forms of music.

Paris even became a hub for movie production as there weren’t many non-English speaking movies with Hollywood having basically a monopoly on what was shown. Because of this, many notable film directors and actors popped up, creating a lot of silent films that were popular at the time. It was clear that many wanted to resemble the famous actors that they saw on the screens, which changed the way that many dressed.

Like how it was seen in the U.S., there were many women that dressed like the one that you see here. Fashion designers had begun to transform the look into what was known as a garconne style. Dresses and hats like this one were a common look for females, as well as wearing fur. Around the world during the 1920s, this became almost the standard for how women had dressed.

Things had gotten better each passing year in France throughout the decade, with people becoming happier as they got further away from World War I and hadn’t known what was coming around the corner with the Great Depression and the second World War. People were simply enjoying themselves, focusing on culture and finding new ways to spend their time. This helped to rebuild Paris, becoming a cultural hub in the world.

Many of the new buildings that were established in the 1920s are still standing today, and give you a chance to go back in time to see how things were. The cafes and bars are mainly still standing, as well, if you want to feel like a real Parisian flapper girl. There are also books that you can read that capture the life of the 1920s era in Paris, including “A Moveable Feast” by Ernest Hemingway and “Everybody Was So Young” by Amanda Vaill.

Though Paris did take a lot of damage from World War I and II, the city has been able to rebuild both times, especially as many became nostalgic for the 1920s. Author Saul Bellow said that “In the 1920s and 30s, artists went to Paris and had a hell of a good time, as I tried to do in ‘48. I went there directly after the war because I was eager to see the action. But I found no great action when I got there…Everybody concentrated on gluing the pieces together.”

Paris is still a cultural destination for people all over the world to this day as their type of culture does still have a lot of influence from that era. Now, there are over 12 million people that live in Paris alone, acting as a major hub for many different areas, though art really does stand out for many. Of course, there’s also the Eiffel Tower, which is still one of the most recognizable landmarks on the globe. Other popular destinations that people flock to in Paris include the Louvre Museum and the Arc de Triomphe, and that’s only scratching the surface.

Referred to as the City of Lights since it was one of the first major cities that used electricity, Paris has a lot to offer. It’s a city that everyone seems to enjoy in their visits and a dream spot for tourists to want to see in person. M.J. Rose said it best by claiming that “I think Paris smells not just sweet but melancholy and curious, sometimes sad but always enticing and seductive. She’s a city for all the sense, for artists and writers and musicians and dreamers, for fantasies, for long walks and wine and lovers and, yes, for mysteries.”