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Entertainment
Historic Unedited Photos They Don't Want You To See
Publication: Historical Archives.
Posted by
760a631d0dea2ae92cb6e9f7b157b927
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Mao Zedong

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Summary:
Zedong ruled as Chairman of the Communist Party of China for more than a quarter-century. During his rule Zedong drove imperialism out of China, but his methods were extraordinarily cruel; he is responsible for the deaths of up to 65 million Chinese.
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Mao Zedong


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These days, there are only a handful of Communist countries around the world. Cuba, Laos and Vietnam all assume this party as being in charge, but the most notable one on the globe is China. It has been this way since the 1940s, and in those years, China has been a world power with its growing economy. Part of the reason that China has made their way into that spot is because of former Chairman Mao Zedong.

However, just because China became a global power doesn’t mean that things went smoothly for Zedong in his regime. There had been millions that passed away due to a famine that happened under his control and classes started to separate greatly while he was in office. Zedong had a big impact on the world’s economy and China’s population in general, making him a polarizing figure for many as there were both positives and negatives for the country.

Zedong was born in Shaoshan, China on December 26, 1893. It was a rural area in which Zedong had grown up on a farm that was operated by his father, which became quite successful during Zedong’s childhood. However, the relationship between Zedong and his father during his childhood had become a contentious one of sorts. Zedong had been set up for a marriage when he was just 13 so that his wealthy family could join forces with other wealthy farm owners, which disappointed Zedong greatly.

During his teenage years, Zedong was more interested in politics after having studied many books. Eventually he developed animosity towards a monarchy which led to a revolution in China that Zedong became part of for several months. Once he had left, Zedong had become more interested in socialism with his views becoming more radical over the years. Zedong joined the party that had begun to gain followers.

Zedong became very politically active in the years that followed, officially joining the Communist Party of China after its founding in the early 1920s. Zedong was a quick riser throughout the political party, becoming active in China’s civil wars. The party hadn’t yet assumed power in China, but that would change in the years that followed World War II. By the end of the 1940s, the People’s Republic of China had officially been created, with Zedong taking the lead of the party.

He had already been the chairman of the party, and held several differently named positions that allowed him to be in charge of China. Part of Zedong’s agenda when assuming power would be called the Great Leap Forward that would change the Chinese economy. While the plan was to grow China, they had actually taken a step backward at first with many people suffering, causing millions of deaths that range in estimates from 20 to 55 million people. Much of this was due to violence from the Zedong regime.

People started to see Zedong in a more positive light after those first few years, however. China’s economy had started to grow with the offset of imperialism within the country and a focus on schools and hospitals becoming more modernized. This allowed the Chinese population to experience a massive boom with people living much longer, and more children becoming educated that made a big impact. While it was on the backs of a lot of victims, China had indeed achieved their goal of making a worldwide statement economically.

Insistent that his plans were working, Zedong said that “The people’s state protects the people. Only when the people have such a state can they educate and remould themselves by democratic methods on a country-wide scale, with everyone taking part, and shake off the influence of domestic and foreign reactionaries…rid themselves of the bad habits and ideas acquired in the old society, not allow themselves to be led astray by the reactionaries and continue to advance towards a socialist and communist society.”

Zedong remained in charge of China and the Communist Party all the way up to his death. He had been suffering from health problems for years starting in the 1970s with many claiming that he had many life-threatening illnesses that he kept hidden from the public. In the spring of 1976, Zedong’s heart started failing him and he suffered from multiple heart attacks that left him unable to lead the country.

Finally, on September 9, 1976, another heart attack is what claimed Zedong’s life at 82 years old. While many around the world had seen Zedong as an extremely controversial leader, there were many in China that were saddened to hear of his death. His remains were held in Beijing in the massive Chairman Mao Memorial Hall that still garners a lot of visitors. Zedong was a very polarizing person and leader overall, as there had been some good things that happened for his country during his reign, but also came with a lot of negatives. To this day, people are still mixed on how Zedong is remembered.

China became closer to a world power while Zedong was in charge, but it came at the cost of millions of people. Historian Frank Dikotter said that Zedong’s reign was “one of the worst catastrophes the world has ever known” due to the millions that had lost their lives. China economist Mao Yushi agreed with these sentiments, saying “The three biggest murderers of the 20th century are Hitler, Stalin and Mao Zedong. That’s commonly accepted among historians outside China and Mao killed the most people. They’re seen as representatives of evil.”

“But in China, Mao’s portrait is still in Tiananmen Square,” he added. “If China wants to develop further, it needs to distinguish between basic right and wrong…Now Mao’s portrait appears on all our banknotes. This didn’t used to be the case before. I think this shows a huge lack of respect to the Chinese people.”