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Historic Unedited Photos They Don't Want You To See
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Entertainment
Historic Unedited Photos They Don't Want You To See
Publication: Historical Archives.
Posted by
760a631d0dea2ae92cb6e9f7b157b927
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John F. Kennedy

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Where:
Dallas, Texas
When:
1963-11-22
Summary:
In one of the most famous assassinations of all time, then-president John F. Kennedy was killed in his motorcade by sniper Lee Harvey Oswald just moments after this picture was taken.
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John F. Kennedy


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  Where:
Dallas, Texas

  When:
1963-11-22

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Next Photo
or read more about below

“Let every nation know, whether it wishes us well or ill, that we shall pay any price, bear any burden, meet any hardship, support any friend, oppose any foe to assure the survival and the success of liberty.” Instantly recognized by his prominent last name, John F. Kennedy served as the 35th President of the United States from January 20, 1961, to his assassination on November 22, 1963. The second-youngest man to serve as president at only 43 years old, Kennedy’s tenure in the Oval Office was marked by high tensions from the Cold War. Despite this, he was revered as one of the country’s most beloved presidents.

Kennedy’s time in the White House was cut tragically short on November 22, 1963, when he was assassinated by Lee Harvey Oswald in Dallas, Texas. As Vice President Lyndon Johnson was sworn into office, Kennedy’s death marked the end of an era later known as Camelot. Today, nearly six decades later, Kennedy is still revered as one of the most iconic figures in American history.

Life and Career

John Fitzgerald “Jack” Kennedy came into this world on May 29, 1917, in Brookline, Massachusetts as the second child of Rose and Joseph P. Kennedy Sr. With the Kennedy legacy well-known in New England thanks to his grandfather serving as the Mayor of Boston and as a United States Congressman, Kennedy had big shoes to fill as he and his eight siblings enjoyed a quiet childhood in Massachusetts before the family settled down in New York City. In the Big Apple, Kennedy attended various private schools before he transferred to Choate, the prestigious Connecticut boarding school where he was voted “most likely to succeed” by his peers.

After graduating from Choate, Kennedy traveled abroad to London and intended to study at the London School of Economics like his older brother, but his ongoing health concerns forced him back to the United States. He enrolled at Princeton University but left after two months when he was hospitalized for stomach issues. Once he recovered, he enrolled at Harvard College, his father’s alma mater, and graduated cum laude in 1940 with a Bachelor of Arts in government and international affairs. He enrolled at the Stanford Graduate School of Business but left mid-semester to travel abroad before joining the United States Navy Reserves.

Serving in the United States Navy from 1941 to 1945, Kennedy commanded a series of boats and earned the Navy and Marine Corps Medal for his service during World War II. After the war, he turned his attention to politics and was elected to the United States House of Representatives in 1947. He served six years and was later elected to the United States Senate from 1953 to 1960. While in the Senate, he published his Pulitzer Prize-winning book, Profiles in Courage, and then set his sights on the Oval Office. Running on the democratic ticket, Kennedy was elected the 35th President of the United States and became the second-youngest man to lead the country after President Theodore Roosevelt.

During his tenure in office, Kennedy battled growing tensions with communist states during the Cold War. He increased the number of military advisors in South Vietnam, authorized the failed joint-CIA attempt to overthrow the Cuban government in the Bay of Pigs Invasion, and prepared for war against Cuba in what later led to the Cuban Missile Crisis in October 1963. Kennedy worked to reestablish stability in the country and with allies abroad, but his tenure as president was tragically cut short in November 1963.

Death and Legacy

With growing tensions in the Democratic Party, Kennedy traveled to Dallas, Texas to smooth things over and was riding in a presidential motorcade through downtown on November 22, 1963, when he was fatally shot by Marxist Lee Harvey Oswald. Shot once in the head and once in the back with the bullet exiting his throat, Kennedy immediately collapsed onto his wife, Jackie, and was rushed to Parkland Hospital where he was pronounced dead just 30 minutes later. In the following hours, Vice President Lyndon B. Johnson was sworn in as President as Oswald was arrested and charged for assassinating the President of the United States.

On November 25, 1963, the 46-year-old Kenney was laid to rest at Arlington National Cemetery after a funeral mass at the Cathedral of St. Matthew the Apostle. The nation mourned the great loss alongside Jackie, Caroline, John Jr. and the rest of the Kennedy family in a moment that marked the end of the Camelot Era. “Don’t let it be forgotten, that once there was a spot, for one brief, shining moment that was known as Camelot,” Jacqueline said in an interview with Life magazine, quoting her late husband’s favorite Broadway musical. “There’ll be great presidents again… but there will never be another Camelot.”

Nearly six decades later, Kennedy’s legacy lives on through his widespread political impact, his contributions to America, and his iconic family. Immediately following his death, Jacqueline retreated from the public eye to raise her children in private. She married Aristotle Onassis in 1968 and remained by his side until his death in 1975. She lost her battle with non-Hodgkin lymphoma in 1994. Kennedy’s youngest son, John-John, shared his father’s charisma and worked as a lawyer, journalist, and magazine publisher. Often rekindling memories of the Camelot Era thanks to his likeness with his father, John also lost his life too soon when the 38-year-old was killed in a plane crash off the coast of Martha’s Vineyard in 1999.

Today, Kennedy’s legacy rests on his daughter, Caroline, his only living heir. An author, attorney, and diplomat, she is no doubt making her father proud after following his footsteps into politics and serving as the 29th United States Ambassador to Japan from 2013 to 2017.