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Historic Unedited Photos They Don't Want You To See
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Entertainment
Historic Unedited Photos They Don't Want You To See
Publication: Historical Archives.
Posted by
760a631d0dea2ae92cb6e9f7b157b927
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Dennis Rader

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Summary:
Rader, also known as the BTK Strangler, was arrested in 2005. He was given 10 consecutive life sentenced: one for each of victims he bound, tortured, and killed (hence his moniker).
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Dennis Rader


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  Where:
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For nearly 20 years, the Wichita, Kansas area had been in a panic thanks to a man named Dennis Rader, who people know more simply as BTK. The nickname tells the story of how truly deranged Rader has been in his life as the acronym stands for Bind, Torture, Kill. There had been many searching for Rader for many years, and it wasn’t until more than a decade after his crime spree had ended that he was finally caught. Now in prison for the rest of his life, Rader has talked about his life and his ruthless crimes.

Rader lived in Wichita for most of his life, though he was born in Pittsburg, Kansas on March 9, 1945. By most accounts, Rader had been quite normal as a young child, and his upbringing was described as being a common one. There was no major disconnect between Rader and his parents, who were active members of the Wichita community. Here, you see a young Rader long before his criminal acts.

Talking about his upbringing, Rader had agreed with statements that his childhood was a typical one. “I got along real will with dad, but mom wasn’t always so happy,” Rader said. “I’ve always loved her. I still love her greatly. But I did have a little bit of a grudge against momma.” Though they weren’t always the closest parents, there was nothing outlandish about Rader’s youth that would’ve suggested that there would be serious problems down the road.

After finishing high school in the early 1960s, Rader had joined the Air Force for the remainder of the decade and even graduated from college during this time. He was working standard jobs once he left the military, but then the problems started. Just before turning 30 years old, Rader began his criminal streak in Wichita. In early 1974, Rader had gone into the home of a family of five, with four of them inside. Rader claimed all of their lives, with the only surviving family member being a young boy that was still at school at the time of the murders.

Following the initial crime, Rader started to work in installing security systems that people had been requesting after finding out about the BTK killer. Little did these people know that Rader had been the one behind the moniker, and that his acts weren’t finished yet. During the rest of the 1970s, Rader had claimed more lives. This continued all the way into the early 1990s, where he had left behind some disturbing crime scenes.

Rader had left behind evidence of his crimes which investigators had begun to compile. This investigation had gone throughout the 1990s and into the early 2000s, having finally arrested Rader in early 2005. Police were very confident that Rader was indeed the infamous BTK killer, charging him with a total of 10 murder counts. He was found guilty of all of these charges with evidence of potentially more than the 10, and Rader received a verdict of life in prison without the possibility of parole.

All but two of Rader’s victims were women, with the only two males being from that first family that Rader had attacked. Most of his female victims were in their 20s with the exception of a couple. In 1985, Rader had killed Marine Hedge (53 years old) and Dolores Davis (62) in his final act of violence in 1991. Some cold cases are still open with Rader being suspected of foul play, with others being able to survive Rader and tell their side of the story.

Rader even had two children of his own, having been married to Paula Dietz for more than 30 years before his arrest. Rader’s daughter, Kerri Rawson, has spoken out about Rader recently, even releasing a book. “Talking about it has helped heal me in a way nothing else could,” she said. “After his arrest I fell into a deep hole of shock and grief, chaos and confusion. (It) took me a very long time to reconcile the man I knew and had grown up to love and grown up next to with the man I was hearing these horrible things about.”

Even Rader has talked about what he’s done to the public. “How could a guy like me, church member, raised a family, go out and do those sort of things?” he said. “I want the people of Sedgwick County, the United States and the world to know that I am a serial killer…It’s a dark side of me.” While many serial killers won’t show remorse, Rader has been different in that regard. “I do,” he said of having feelings toward his victims. “I mean, I have a lot of feelings for them. I guess it’s more of an achievement for this object in the hunt. Or sort of more of a high, I guess.”

Unfortunately, Rader also embraced his infamous name throughout all of the years. “I guess you could say that,” he said. “Yeah, now I had a label on me. It was like the Green River Killer and Son of Sam…I don’t think it was actually the person that I was after, I think it was the dream. I know that’s not really nice to say about a person, but they were basically an object. They were just an object. That’s all they were. I had more satisfaction building up to it and afterwards than I did the actual killing of the person.”

“I can’t stop it so, the monster goes on,” Rader said. “And hurt me as well as society. Society can be thankful that there are ways for people like me to relieve myself at time by day dreams of some victims being torture and being mine.”