Entertainment
Historic Unedited Photos They Don't Want You To See
Publication: Historical Archives. Posted by
760a631d0dea2ae92cb6e9f7b157b927
Advertisements:
Entertainment
Historic Unedited Photos They Don't Want You To See
Publication: Historical Archives.
Posted by
760a631d0dea2ae92cb6e9f7b157b927
Advertisements:
Benito Mussolini

Advertisements:
Where:
Unknown
When:
Unknown
Summary:
Mussolini was the fascist dictator of Italy for two decades in the twentieth century. He was eventually killed by his own people.
Advertisements:
Next Photo
or read more about below

Benito Mussolini


Advertisements:
  Where:
Unknown

  When:
Unknown

Advertisements:
Next Photo
or read more about below

While many of us are used to electing leaders into office, there have been countries around the world that have had a more violent way of assuming power. This is even true in Italy, a country that these days we consider to be a world power and currently has a presidential system that has been in place since the end of World War II. Prior to that, it was Benito Mussolini that had led the country after assuming power through a revolution where he was in charge of the Fascist Party.

Italy did experience some growth while Mussolini was in charge, but it led to many problems within the country. Eventually, Italy found themselves involved heavily in World War II when the Fascist leader pledged his allegiance to Nazi leader Adolf Hitler. By the end of the war, both men were out of power as they had lost their lives and each of their countries has changed dramatically in the years since, learning from the mistakes of the early 20th century.

Mussolini was born in the small town of Predappio, Italy on July 29, 1883 where he had come to develop his political views from his father, a blacksmith named Alessandro. Alessandro himself had been a socialist and an Italian nationalist, which he ingrained onto his young son. While he was young, Mussolini would have mixed results as a student. Though his schoolwork hadn’t struggled much, Mussolini did get into trouble, twice stabbing students during his early years that landed him in trouble, leading to boarding school.

When he reached his late teenage years, Mussolini didn’t want to serve in the military and moved to Switzerland where he continued his studies into socialism. Because of his views, Mussolini would lead a strike for the workers of the country, landing him in jail and eventually back in Italy after a deportation. He then had to rejoin the military after escaping from service years prior, and returned to fight in the first World War.

In the 1910s, Mussolini had become one of the most well known socialists in Italy, but it wouldn’t last for long. During the outbreak of World War I, Mussolini’s views on the conflict led to him being ousted from the political party. He changed his views dramatically as a result and founded the Fascist party that would start to gain steam during the later part of the decade with more followers joining in on his ideals. Mussolini at one point even had the support of the United States after media coverage had portrayed the leader in a positive light.

By the early 1920s, the Fascist party had grown in numbers into the 10s of thousands, and they started to believe that they could seize power in Italy. Late in 1922, Mussolini and many members of his party had marched on Rome demanding that then Prime Minister Luigi Facta be removed from office. The amount of support that Mussolini had made him powerful, and Mussolini was placed in charge as the new Prime Minister as the result of his uprising.

The Italian government had total control of just about everything. “The Fascist State directs and controls the entrepreneurs,” Mussolini said in the early 1930s. “Whether it be in our fisheries or in our heavy industry in the Val d’Aosta. There the State actually owns the mines and carries on transport, for the railways are state property. So are many of the factories. We term is State intervention. If anything fails to work properly, the State intervenes. The capitalists will go on doing what they are told, down to the very end. They have no option and cannot put up any fight. Capital is not God; it is only a means to an end.”

Fascist Italy would look like a much different country than it did before with organizations being put in place to ensure that Mussolini remained in charge. Due to Mussolini’s reign, there had been many that had no choice but to convert to Fascism or face serious consequences. During the middle of the 1930s, Mussolini agreed to join forces with Nazi Germany to make them a European power that started World War II.

The Axis leaders of World War II had met their fates either during or following the conclusion of the war. Hitler would end up taking his own life in his bunker while the Allies had closed in on Berlin while Hideki Tojo of Japan was sentenced to an execution by hanging in 1948. As for Mussolini, he was executed as well. Toward the end of April 1945, the war in Europe had been coming to a close and Italy was feeling the Allied invasion.

Mussolini saw the writing on the wall and intended to escape his home country with his mistress, but was caught by Communist Party members in Italy. On April 28, Mussolini was shot by a firing squad in a small town with his corpse being decimated in Milan shortly after. Italians had celebrated his death in the streets, hanging him upside down with other members of the Fascist Party also suffering the same fate. It took more than 10 years for his body to be fully recovered to be interred.

The initial reaction for Mussolini’s death was a celebration for many around the world, especially due to his association with Hitler. However, in the years that have passed, there have been many apologists for Mussolini’s leadership. Antonio Tajani of Italy (representing the country in the European Parliament) even said that “You don’t have to agree with his methods…but let’s be honest, Mussolini built roads, bridges, buildings, sports installations, he remade parts of Italy. Generally speaking I don’t think his government action was positive, but things were done.” Obviously this was met with backlash, as the typical view of Mussolini’s reign as the Italian leader was seen as a highly negative one.