Entertainment
Historic Unedited Photos They Don't Want You To See
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Entertainment
Historic Unedited Photos They Don't Want You To See
Publication: Historical Archives.
Posted by
760a631d0dea2ae92cb6e9f7b157b927
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Audrey Hepburn... the Homebody?

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Where:
Unknown
When:
1950s
Summary:
This colorized photo looks convincingly modern, but its age is given away by the newspaper-lined trashcan. Plastic bags hadn't been invented yet!
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Audrey Hepburn... the Homebody?


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  Where:
Unknown

  When:
1950s

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Next Photo
or read more about below

It’s been more than a half century since Audrey Hepburn was a full-time actress in Hollywood, but to this day is revered as one of the best to ever grace the big screen, and one that a lot of actresses still look up to. Hpeburn’s career might not have been the lengthiest, but her legacy is certainly among the top for actors, cementing her place in the annals of Hollywood royalty.

Hepburn hailed from Brussels, Belgium, where she was born as Audrey Ruston on May 4, 1929 to British and Dutch parents. She had moved around quite a bit during her childhood as her parents divorced and World War II broke out in Europe, eventually making her way to the Netherlands following the war. At first, Hepburn had focused on ballet, but turned her attention to acting, getting on stage for the first time in 1948.

The same year, Hepburn made her film debut in a small role in “Dutch in Seven Lessons”. She then added some small television roles in Europe and some more minor film roles before having her big breakout in 1953. That was when Hepburn starred in the film “Roman Holiday”, earning herself and Oscar win for Best Actress. Instantly, Hepburn became one of the hottest names around, spending the rest of the 1950s and 1960s as a huge star.

She was nominated for four more Oscars during this period thanks to a lot of hit films. Some of her most memorable roles included “Funny Face”, “My Fair Lady” and, of course, “Breakfast at Tiffany’s”. By then, Hepburn had become an acting and fashion icon, but that’s not what she was always about, apparently.

Here, we see Hepburn in front of an oven, checking on some food inside of a home back in 1950. Not many could make home cooking look this glamorous, but apparently it wasn’t an uncommon sight according to her very own son, Luca Dotti. Dotti’s father, Andrea, was Hepburn’s second husband. The two were married in 1969, a year after a divorce from her first husband, Mel Ferrer.

Hepburn had a son named Sean from her first marriage, and her son Luca was born in February of 1970. Hepburn and Andrea Dotti would divorce when Luca was 12, though she raised him for the rest of his childhood alongside partner Robert Wolders. According to Luca, things at home were incredibly tame despite his mother being one of the biggest stars in Hollywood history. “She was very normal, and managed to raise a normal family that fights and all of that,” he said. “When you’re a child you don’t properly understand that; you take it for granted.”

The normalcy continued into the kitchen. There were no personal chefs at home, and this was just about the fanciest that you’d see Hepburn dressed when she wasn’t on the red carpet. Dotti even made a book about their life at home, which included a cookbook with some of the recipes that Hepburn had stashed away in the house. While the recipes weren’t very complicated according to Dotti, they were certainly enjoyable for the family and something that most could learn.

“Her cooking went like (her personality). She only kept maybe 10 percent of the heavy, elaborate recipes she collected in the 1950s,” Dotti said. “All of the others she took on a daily basis from friends and experience. Her recipes were never about being a chef or making an impression.” For Hepburn, a lot of the cooking centered around very healthy foods, racking up fruits and vegetables, with breakfast being her big specialty. Throughout her entire life, Dotti said that she gathered almost any recipe that she could find, and even taught people around her, sharing some of her signature dishes.

Eating meals together was incredibly important in the Hepburn household. “In so many families, the breakfast, lunchtime and dinner is where you exchange thoughts, gossip and news,” Dotti said in his book. “It’s where you open up, it’s where you sometimes fight. It was important to my mother, and for our family, that we gather around the table, especially when we were more grown up and not living in the house anymore.”

Hepburn did spend a lot of her time at home toward the late 1960s, even before Dotti’s birth. She became more interested in life with her family than on the big screen during this time, going into what was basically a retirement. However, 1967’s “Wait Until Dark” wouldn’t be the last time that we saw Hepburn on the big screen. In 1976, she came back to movies for “Robin and Marian”, playing the latter character alongside Sean Connery.

After that, Hepburn appeared in just three more films; 1979’s “Bloodline”, 1981’s “They All Laughed” and made her final appearance in 1989 with “Always”. Her last television appearance as an actress was in 1987 with a TV film called “Love Among Thieves”, with her final production being a PBS documentary in 1993 with “Gardens of the World with Audrey Hepburn”. For the most part, though, it was simply family and humanitarian work that took up the final decades of her life.

Sadly, in late 1992, Hepburn started to experience some strong pain in her abdomen, leading to her hospitalization. It was found that Hepburn had been suffering from a rare form of cancer that had spread, causing her to go into chemotherapy. After battling the disease as much as she could, Hepburn passed away on January 20, 1993 at the age of 63. She had been mostly retired for over a quarter century at that point, but still remained one of the biggest names in entertainment, and still holds that candle to this day.

Many had mourned the death of the Hollywood icon, even those far away from the scene. This included UNICEF, the charity that Hepburn had worked very closely with for many years. The group’s director, James Grant, offered up some very kind words, saying that Hepburn’s death was “a painful and irreplaceable loss for her family, friends, for children everywhere and UNICEF,” adding that “What you see in Audrey Hepburn is exactly what you get. There is no public or private persona. She is what she seems to be. It may sound boring, but Audrey is one of the most special human beings I’ve ever met in my entire life.”